IDC SCHOOL OF GEOMETRIC PATTERNS IN ISLAMIC ARTS

Spring 2019

Courses offered and dates:

  • (DP1) Decagonal Patterns in Islamic Art (part 1), 18 to 22 March, 2019
  • (DP2) Decagonal Patterns in Islamic Art (part 2), 25 to 29 March, 2019

Place – Istanbul Design Center – Buhara Özbekler Tekkesi, Binbirdirek Mahallesi Şehitmehmetpaşa, Yokuşu Sokak No:40, Sokullu Mehmetpaşa Camii karşısı, Sultan Ahmet, Fatih, İstanbul

Courses description

Decagonal gereh Kukeldash Madrasah style 

(DP1) Decagonal Patterns in Islamic Art (part 1)

Course level – introductory, intermediate

This is one of the possible versions of a starting course on geometric patterns in Islamic art for complete beginners. The course introduces basic terms and techniques for geometric pattern design using decagonal approach. The course will cover the following topics:

  1. Historical introduction to geometric pattern design in Islamic arts, various ways of approaching pattern design, origins of gereh patterns
  2. Rules of gereh design and the concept of first line
  3. Proportions of geometric patterns (only decagonal type)
  4. Basic styles of decagonal patterns and patterns on decagonal grids
  5. Selected Central Asian, Seljuk and Ottoman examples from Topkapi scroll and kundekari art in Turkey
  6. Simple inflation procedure for patterns with the“duck feet” motif

It is expected that each participant will take part in a mini exhibition of decagonal patterns. The exhibition be organized at the end of the last day of the course. 

Tools and materials – usually IDC provides all drawing tools and materials for the registered course participants. However you may feel more comfortable if you decide to use your favorite drawing tools and papers. Thus consider bringing with you your own drawing bag (A2 or larger), your favorite tools and selection of good quality A2 papers.

Complex gereh based on traditional Seljuk designs

(DP2)Decagonal Patterns in Islamic Art (part 2)

Course level – advanced

This is second course devoted specifically to the structural design of decagonal patterns. It is not simple course and you should take it only if you passed any introductory course,DP1 preferably. The course will cover a few techniques that can be used to produce large decagonal patterns. Below are listed some of the possible topics that may be covered in this course. The exact list of topics will be decided during the course depending on the knowledge of geometry and drawing skills of the participants. Most of the designs in this course are complex patterns with large number of elements. This unfortunately will limit the number of examples produced in this course. One of the possible solutions for this problem can be a collective design of some major examples. A number of examples used in this course are taken from Topkapi scroll and real places in Turkey.

  1. Brief revision of styles of decagonal patterns
  2. Kukeldash Madrasah style of patterns and the ‘giveaway and take’ pattern design technique
  3. Pattern from the St. George Church in Istanbul and the ‘walking pentagons’ technique
  4. Topkapi scroll inflation technique
  5. Pinecone inflation technique
  6. Some other techniques for large scale decagonal designs

One of the outcomes of the course could be an exhibition of a few large scale pattern(s) made by teams of 2-4 participants. The exhibition can be organized at the end of the last day of the course. Tools and materials – usually IDC provides all drawing tools and materials for the registered course participants. However you may feel more comfortable if you decide to use your favorite drawing tools and papers. Thus consider bringing with you your own drawing bag (A3 or larger), your favorite tools and selection of good quality A3 papers.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: